18th century workwear brought bang up to date. 18th century workwear brought bang up to date.

18th century workwear brought bang up to date.

Corduroy has had a rich and varied history. Although its fustian roots are ancient, the fabric with ridges we now think of as corduroy came from Manchester in the 1770s and established itself as the go-to rugged workwear for the workers of the industrial revolution. That quickly placed it as a badge of pride for the working classes. As Engels explains in his seminal work The Condition of the Working Class in England, “Fustian has become the proverbial costume of working men”. Although it was called fustian cloth at the time, early marketeers in search of exotic French connotations started to rename it as corde-du-roi from the French ‘cloth of the king’. Ironically, as the fabric gained popularity all over Europe, it was simply known as Manchester cloth.

More recently it’s been used as a mark of the upper class – think red cord trousers with tweed. Or as a statement of anti-cool by Jarvis Cocker when he sported a corduroy suit. It’s been claimed at different times by landed gentry, left wing activists and laid back geography teachers – cord has been used to say many different things at different times. Rohan corduroy is warm, soft, tough and technical. It looks smart and makes a great pair of general ‘knocking about’ trousers and a very versatile skirt – it always feels a little bit more ‘grown-up’ and presentable than denim. And because this is Rohan corduroy, it is easycare, relatively crease-resistant, quick-drying, light and packable. Other clever details include secret pockets – just enough space for a card and cash.

Torres Cords

Torres Cord Trousers

A wardrobe classic with easycare Rohan technology, a secret pocket and all-day comfort.

Torres Cords
Torres Cord Skirt

Torres Cord Skirt

A simple, practical and effortlessly stylish skirt for autumn and winter. The challenge is to try and find the secret pocket.

Torres Cord Skirt